Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10646/3904
Title: Limitation of human rights in International Law and the Zimbabwean constitution.
Authors: Maja, Innocent
innocent@majasque.com
imaja@ibj.org
imaja@law.uz.ac.zw
Keywords: Human rights
International Human Rights
Constitution of Zimbabwe
Limitation of rights
Law of general application
Treaties
Issue Date: 2018
Publisher: University of Zimbabwe
Citation: Maja, I. (2018). Limitation of human rights in International Law and the Zimbabwean constitution. University of Zimbabwe Law Journal, 1(1), 117-134.
Abstract: Human rights contained in international treaties, regional treaties and national constitutions are generally not absolute but are often qualified and subject to reasonable restrictions.Currie and de Waal argues that ‘constitutional rights and freedoms are not absolute. They have boundaries set by the rights of others and by important social concerns such as public order, safety, health and democratic values.’ This essentially means that not all infringement of rights is unconstitutional.Rights can be limited or justifiably infringed if the reason for infringement is justifiable ‘in an open and democratic society based on human dignity, equality and freedom.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10646/3904
ISSN: 2617-2046
Appears in Collections:Private Law Staff Publications

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