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Assessment of conjunctive use of small earth dams and boreholes for sustainable rural livelihoods in a semi-arid area: Case of Lilongwe West Rural Groundwater Project area, Malawi

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dc.contributor.author Kambuku, Dwight Davison
dc.date.accessioned 2012-08-30T08:42:49Z
dc.date.available 2012-08-30T08:42:49Z
dc.date.issued 2012-08-30
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10646/911
dc.description.abstract Semi-arid Africa is well known for its unpredictable rainfall patterns, increased cases of drought and dry spells, high evaporative demands and increasing population which put pressure on water resources. Local experiences in SADC show that conjunctive use of surface and groundwater would cushion these pressures. This study was aimed at assessing water demand and availability paradigms, and water allocation process as functions of conjunctive use of small earth dams and groundwater (shallow wells and boreholes) for small scale agriculture in the study area for a period beginning April, 2005. Assessment of conjunctive use of surface and groundwater for sustainable livelihood was carried out on 10 earth dams and 23 boreholes and 5 shallow wells of 22 villages in Traditional Authorities Kalolo and Khongoni in Lilongwe district in Malawi. Traditionally, shallow wells, ponds, running rivers, swamps or marshes have been supporting the rural masses and their livestock as sources of water for drinking, domestic use and small scale agriculture. It was revealed through focus group discussions and interviews that less than 28% of the households use water from dams and boreholes/shallow wells for small scale irrigation conjunctively while 30% of the total households use shallow wells as the main source of water for small scale irrigation. 11% of the total households use water from boreholes with 31% using water from small earth dams for small scale irrigation. Presently, villages surrounding Kamanzi dam experience water shortages 93% of the time in dry season, with supply meeting only 26% of demand. However, inclusion of water from boreholes to total supply helps the system meet 31% of demand. By 2039, the villages around Kamanzi dam will experience shortage about 100% of the time with supply meeting only 11% of demand. Village Development Committees (VDC) control water allocation process and customs and traditions form basis for this process. Water Poverty Index (WPI) showed that it is resource and use based and that conjunctive use of small earth dams has advantage on both environment and people’s livelihoods in the area. It is thus recommended that conjunctive use of earth dams and boreholes/shallow wells be encouraged for small scale irrigation in order to curb resource depletion and maximize resource benefits for the betterment of local people. en_ZW
dc.description.sponsorship WATERnet en_ZW
dc.language.iso en_ZW en_ZW
dc.subject Boreholes en_ZW
dc.subject conjunctive use en_ZW
dc.subject groundwater en_ZW
dc.subject reliability en_ZW
dc.subject small earth dams en_ZW
dc.subject sustainable livelihoods en_ZW
dc.subject water demand en_ZW
dc.title Assessment of conjunctive use of small earth dams and boreholes for sustainable rural livelihoods in a semi-arid area: Case of Lilongwe West Rural Groundwater Project area, Malawi en_ZW
thesis.degree.advisor Kaseke, E. (Eng.)
thesis.degree.advisor Makurira, H. (Eng.)
thesis.degree.advisor Ngongondo, C.
thesis.degree.country Zimbabwe en_ZW
thesis.degree.discipline Civil Engineering en_ZW
thesis.degree.faculty Faculty of Engineering en_ZW
thesis.degree.grantor University of Zimbabwe en_ZW
thesis.degree.grantoremail specialcol@uzlib.uz.ac.zw
thesis.degree.level MSc en_ZW
thesis.degree.name Master of Science in Integrated Water Resources Management en_ZW
thesis.degree.thesistype Thesis en_ZW
dc.date.defense 2009-06


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