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Biological Nitrogen Fixation: Sustaining African Agriculture into the Twenty-First Century?

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dc.creator Mpepereki, Shemunyoro M.
dc.creator Makonese, Fred T.
dc.date.accessioned 2015-08-28T08:26:40Z
dc.date.accessioned 2015-12-08T10:56:00Z
dc.date.available 2015-08-28T08:26:40Z
dc.date.available 2015-12-08T10:56:00Z
dc.date.created 2015-08-28T08:26:40Z
dc.date.issued 1998
dc.identifier Mpepereki, S.M. and Makonese, F.T. (1998) Biological Nitrogen Fixation: Sustaining African Agriculture into the Twenty-First Century? In: Mpepereki, S.M & Makonese, F.T. (eds.) Harnessing Biological Nitrogen Fixation in African Agriculture: Challenges and Opportunities: Sixth International Conference of the African Association for Biological Nitrogen Fixation, 12-17 September, 1994, Harare, Zimbabwe: selected papers. Mt. Pleasant, Harare: UZ Publications, pp. 257-258.
dc.identifier 0-908307-58-6
dc.identifier http://opendocs.ids.ac.uk/opendocs/handle/123456789/6888
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10646/2422
dc.description.abstract The main objective of the African Association for Biological Nitrogen Fixation (AABNF) is to promote research, training and the use of biological nitrogen fixation systems to increase food production, reduce the need for purchased nitrogen fertiliser inputs, alleviate malnutrition and improve the environment in Africa. This objective contributes to the conservation and sustainable use of natural resources, and the sharing of benefits arising out of the utilisation of the results of relevant research, all key considerations in national development strategies, plans and programmes, as stipulated in Agenda 21 and in a number of Conventions in particular the Convention on Biological Diversity. The research carried out by scientists working on BNF in Africa has confirmed in controlled environments and in both experimental and farmers’ fields, the potential of biological nitrogen fixing systems to contribute to sustainable agriculture. In particular, the potential benefits to the well-being of the populations living in rural areas are significant.
dc.language en
dc.publisher University of Zimbabwe (UZ) Publications. (Department of Soil Sciences)
dc.rights http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/
dc.rights University of Zimbabwe (UZ)
dc.subject Agriculture
dc.subject Technology
dc.title Biological Nitrogen Fixation: Sustaining African Agriculture into the Twenty-First Century?
dc.type Book chapter
dc.type Conference paper


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