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Teachers' Coping in Financial Difficulties: a Case Study of the 'Classroom Tuckshop' Phenomenon in Zimbabwean Urban Primary Schools in Norton

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dc.creator Bondai, Beatrice
dc.creator Muchenje, Francis
dc.date.accessioned 2015-08-14T14:14:35Z
dc.date.accessioned 2015-12-08T10:55:44Z
dc.date.available 2015-08-14T14:14:35Z
dc.date.available 2015-12-08T10:55:44Z
dc.date.created 2015-08-14T14:14:35Z
dc.date.issued 2008-11
dc.identifier Bondai, B. and Muchenje, F. (2008) Teachers' Coping in Financial Difficulties: a Case Study of the 'Classroom Tuckshop' Phenomenon in Zimbabwean Urban Primary Schools in Norton. Zimbabwe Journal of Educational Research (ZJER), vol. 20, no.3, (pp. 261-279) UZ, Mt. Pleasant, Harare: HRRC.
dc.identifier 1013-3445
dc.identifier http://opendocs.ids.ac.uk/opendocs/handle/123456789/6765
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10646/2349
dc.description.abstract The study sought to investigate the prevalence of the ‘classroom tuck shop' phenomenon in Zimbabwean urban primary schools. The sample consisted of five school heads, fifty teachers, and one hundred pupils, all drawn from five urban schools in Norton. Interviews were conducted with the five school heads and one hundred pupils. Questionnaires were administered to the teachers and focused group discussions were conducted with the school teachers and pupils. The study found out that the ‘classroom tuck shop ‘phenomenon is prevalent in urban primary schools. A large number of teachers felt that this phenomenon does not affect the teacher pupil relationship though the majority of pupils were of the opinion that teachers should not sell items in their classrooms. All the school heads felt that this practice negatively affects the quality of instructs n. It was also found out that teachers have resorted to this practice as a result of the unfavourable macro economic environment, which has witnessed a decline in the status of the teacher. The study recommends that teachers should not sell items in their classroom. The concerned Ministry should seriously consider reviewing teachers ‘salaries and schools should be allowed to engage in income generating projects to cushion teachers from the effects of the harsh inflationary macro economic environment.
dc.language en
dc.publisher Human Resource Research Centre (HRRC) , University of Zimbabwe (UZ.)
dc.rights http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/
dc.rights University of Zimbabwe (UZ)
dc.subject Education
dc.subject Finance
dc.subject Population
dc.title Teachers' Coping in Financial Difficulties: a Case Study of the 'Classroom Tuckshop' Phenomenon in Zimbabwean Urban Primary Schools in Norton
dc.type Article


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