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Continuity And Progression In Science Curricula From The Primary School To The Secondary School In Masvingo District In Zimbabwe

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dc.creator Moyo, P.V.
dc.creator Nyikahadzoyi, M.R.
dc.date.accessioned 2014-12-05T15:51:56Z
dc.date.accessioned 2015-12-08T10:54:30Z
dc.date.available 2014-12-05T15:51:56Z
dc.date.available 2015-12-08T10:54:30Z
dc.date.created 2014-12-05T15:51:56Z
dc.date.issued 2006-12
dc.identifier Moyo, P.V. & Nyikahadzoyi, M. R. (2006) Continuity And Progression In Science Curricula From The Primary School To The Secondary School In Masvingo District In Zimbabwe, ZJER Vol. 18, No.3. Harare, Mt. Pleasant: HRRC
dc.identifier 1013-3445
dc.identifier http://opendocs.ids.ac.uk/opendocs/handle/123456789/5402
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10646/1926
dc.description.abstract This study sought to find out if there was a meaningful relationship between the primary school science curriculum and the secondary school science curriculum in Masvingo District in Zimbabwe. The research design was a descriptive survey in which the researchers analysed both the primary school and the secondary school national science syllabuses and sought the opinions of both the primary school teachers and the secondary school science teachers in Masvingo District on what they considered to be important science process skills (SPS). This was done in order to detect any similarities and differences between these syllabuses as well as perceptions of the teachers on the issues. For the latter, the Spearman Rank Order correlation coefficient was calculated in order to quantify the degree of agreement j disagreement. A structured interview was held with both the primary school teachers and the secondary school science teachers on the kind and extent of liaison there was between them in terms of science teaching. The research findings revealed that the primary and secondary science syllabuses had a lot in common; the primary school teachers and the secondary school science teachers were in general agreement on important SPS; there were a number of significant differences in. the way science was taught, learnt and assessed at the two educational levels and that there was no formal liaison between the primary school teachers and the secondary school science teachers. These research findings seem to suggest that there is need for more use of SPS at primary school level and a lot more liaison between the primary school teachers and the secondary school science teachers.
dc.language en
dc.publisher Human Resources Research Centre (HRRC); University of Zimbabwe
dc.rights http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/
dc.rights University of Zimbabwe
dc.subject Education
dc.subject Science and Society
dc.title Continuity And Progression In Science Curricula From The Primary School To The Secondary School In Masvingo District In Zimbabwe
dc.type Article


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